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Prostrate Info

Prostrate Info

The prostate cancer incidence rate is grouped by race and ethnicity. The graph below shows that in 2014, black men had the highest rate of getting prostate cancer, followed by white, Hispanic, American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN), and Asian/Pacific Islander

Studies show that African American men are approximately 70 percent more likely to develop prostate cancer in their lifetime than Caucasian or Hispanic men. Age: The risk of developing prostate cancer increases with age.

Prostate cancer risk factors

Some common risk factors for prostate cancer include:

GENERAL
  • Race: Studies show that African American men are approximately 70 percent more likely to develop prostate cancer in their lifetime than Caucasian or Hispanic men.
  • Age: The risk of developing prostate cancer increases with age. While only one in 10,000 men under age 40 will be diagnosed with prostate cancer, one in 15 men in their 60s will be diagnosed with the disease.

GENETICS

  • Family history: Men with an immediate blood relative, such as a father or brother, who has or had prostate cancer, are twice as likely to develop the disease. If there is another family member diagnosed with the disease, the chances of getting prostate cancer increase.

LIFESTYLE

  • Diet: A diet high in saturated fat, as well as obesity, increases the risk of prostate cancer.
  • High testosterone levels: Men who use testosterone therapy are more likely to develop prostate cancer, as an increase in testosterone stimulates the growth of the prostate gland.

OTHER CONDITIONS

  • Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN): This condition may be associated with increased risk of prostate cancer. PIN is a condition in which prostate gland cells look abnormal when examined with a microscope. It is not necessarily linked with any symptoms. Nearly one half of men will be diagnosed with PIN before age 50.
  • Genome changes: Certain genes have been known to elevate prostate cancer risks, such as BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.

 

 

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